jtotheizzoe:

Albert Einstein’s graduation report card, age 17. Looks like he was good at math (6 is the top score). French language and literature? Needs some work.

(via Retronaut)

(Reblogged from jtotheizzoe)

quotedquarterly:

I found this 1942 photo of a RAF pilot getting a haircut and reading Greenmantle by John Buchan. I’ve got a bunch more photos/posts about book publishing during WWII on my BooksForVictory blog.

(Reblogged from tierradentro)

When Farrow was reluctant to film a scene that depicted a dazed and preoccupied Rosemary wandering into the middle of a Manhattan street into oncoming traffic, Polanski pointed to her pregnancy padding and reassured her, “no one’s going to hit a pregnant woman”. The scene was successfully shot with Farrow walking into real traffic and Polanski following, operating the hand-held camera since he was the only one willing to do it. 

(Source: clarkents)

(Reblogged from velificantes)

dsmiscellany:

Why Our Brains Make Us Click on Lists: The New Yorker

In the current media environment, a list is perfectly designed for our brain. We are drawn to it intuitively, we process it more efficiently, and we retain it with little effort.

Why BuzzFeed is so addictive.

(Reblogged from dsmiscellany)

jtotheizzoe:

A Grander Canyon

Last Friday, a rare and beautiful thing happened in Arizona’s Grand Canyon. It filled with fog. We’re used to seeing clouds above the Grand Canyon…

…not IN it. This cottony ocean was caused by a meteorological phenomenon called a temperature inversion.

A temperature inversion is when the normally warm layer of air near the Earth’s surface, normally heated by convection currents from the sun-baked land beneath it, is replaced by a colder air mass. This can happen when a warm front flows over the top of a cooler one, often in winter months.

Although the desert air in Arizona is pretty arid, as the cool atmosphere poured into the canyon, what little water there was condensed into clouds, flowing like waterfalls and filling the mighty canyon with a billowing ocean. 

(images via Grand Canyon National Park on Facebook)

(Reblogged from aldeburgh)

Netflix may be about to fall victim to the binge-watching revolution it started
Zachary M. Seward, qz.com

Net­flix has been coy about how “binge-watching” is affect­ing its busi­ness, but it may drop a big hint in its earn­ings report later today. And if it does, investors could get hit pret­ty hard.

The issue is how Net­flix accounts for the cost o…

(Reblogged from dsmiscellany)
10 reasons why today’s TV is better than movies
Stuart Heritage, theguardian.com
Forget what you’ve read about cinema’s dominance over the small screen. Television has plenty to teach the movies about characterisation, storytelling and breaking new talent• Read 10 reasons today’s movies trump TVHave you heard the news? T…

10 reasons why today’s TV is better than movies
Stuart Heritage, theguardian.com

Forget what you’ve read about cinema’s dominance over the small screen. Television has plenty to teach the movies about characterisation, storytelling and breaking new talent

• Read 10 reasons today’s movies trump TV

Have you heard the news? T…

(Reblogged from dsmiscellany)
dsmiscellany:

How Somebody Forced the World’s Internet Traffic Through Belarus and Iceland
Arik Hesseldahl, allthingsd.com
This is a deeply tech­ni­cal but poten­tial­ly very trou­bling story. Imag­ine one day you’re using the Inter­net the same way you do every day. Read­ing the news, shop­ping, send­ing email, check­ing your bank and cred­it card bal­ances. Maybe ev…

Wow.

dsmiscellany:

How Somebody Forced the World’s Internet Traffic Through Belarus and Iceland
Arik Hesseldahl, allthingsd.com

This is a deeply tech­ni­cal but poten­tial­ly very trou­bling story. Imag­ine one day you’re using the Inter­net the same way you do every day. Read­ing the news, shop­ping, send­ing email, check­ing your bank and cred­it card bal­ances. Maybe ev…

Wow.

(Reblogged from dsmiscellany)

SHOULD LITERATURE BE USEFUL?
Lee Siegel, newyorker.com

Two recent studies have concluded that serious literary fiction makes people more empathetic, and humanists everywhere are clinking glasses in celebration. But I wonder whether this is a victory for humanism’s impalpable enrichments and enchantments, or for the quantifying power of social science.

After Chernobyl, they refused to leave
Holly Morris, cnn.com

But amidst the complicated real-life calculations and compromises — where science and politics meet to duke out the viability of nuclear energy — the long, deep, human parable of Chernobyl is often lost. That story is partly embodied in an unlikely community of some 130 people, called “self-settlers” who, today, live inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Almost all of them are women, the men having died off due to overuse of alcohol and cigarettes, if not the effects of elevated radiation. About 116,000 people were evacuated from the Zone at the time of the accident. Some 1,200 of them did not accept that fate. Of that group, the remaining women, now in their 70s and 80s, are the last survivors of a group that defied authorities — and it would seem, common sense — and illegally returned to their ancestral homes shortly after the accident.